“In the end, Captain America does not make the heroic sacrifice, thus further proving that Black Widow can handle the emotional weight of being a lead character. As if anyone could really forget the most quoted line in “The Avengers” — “I’ve got red in my ledger; I’d like to wipe it out” — it helps to have that line fresh in your mind when deconstructing what Widow does in the final act of what’s billed as a Captain America movie. Black Widow doesn’t wipe out the red in her ledger. No, she blasts her ledger out to the world, like it was the grisliest email forward of all time. We know from here heart to heart with Hawkeye that the shame she feels about what she’s done is real, and she hesitates when she realizes that taking down the bad guys means revealing her secrets. But she does it anyway, because she’s not just a spy anymore; she’s a super hero, and she makes a super hero’s sacrifice.”

"CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER" PROVES BLACK WIDOW’S READY TO GO SOLO

I didn’t even think about it at the time but yeah, Natasha being the one to reveal SHIELDS, and her own, secrets probably took more courage and self sacrifice for her than carjacking an alien in the middle of a galactic sized batte.

(via ahandsomestark)

fangirlhasthephonebox:

do-you-fancy-billie-piper-sir:

thecoppercow:

all-the-fangirl-feels:

shadowsofwho:

original-southern-timelord:

judgmentalowl:

A REMINDER THAT DONNA IS THE BEST

Friendly reminder in one novel a character says ”flipping” a lot and The Doctor goes ”Yeah that’s the TARDIS’s swear filter”

Suddenly I like the word “flipping” very much.

imagine the 12th Doctor going: you flipping flip. get out of flipping TARDIS you flipping piece of flip. 

i would cry

*knock knock* “FLIP THE FLIP IN OR FLIP THE FLIP OFF!!!”

"FLIPPIN’ FLIP ME"

(Source: wearementallylinked)

“1:all fungi are edible.
2: some fungi are only edible once”
Terry Pratchett (via bableman)

thranduilistic:

When Castiel falls from the line of angels, he becomes a sales associate and starts a completely normal life. He wouldn’t dare imagine such thing as to meet someone and fall again - in a completely different fashion. This is the story of an angel and a human, defeating the obstacles of Heaven and Hell together.

"The Fall" | A Destiel Movie Trailer

(Source: thranduilistic)

captainofalltheships:

Chrys watches GoT [x]

angelophile:

Katniss Everdeen photographed by starrfallphotography on Deviantart.

Cosplay by Aspen of White Rabbit Cosplay and Photography.

I kinda of what a fic where the reason (or at least one of the reasons) why Kurt is doing push-ups here is to burn off some extra energy and frustration because he was totally expecting and wanting morning sex

(Source: charlene-kaye)

(Source: allonsyalyssa)

(Source: ellengifs)

c-is-for-circinate:

allst0ries:

c-is-for-circinate:

I think I finally put my finger on what bothers me about all the tons of meta discussing how Mako Mori is really the main character of Pacific Rim.

Hijacking your post because you managed to articulated the thoughts I have on Moffat vs. RTD Doctor Who.

RTD framed the show to align the companion and the audience. Yes, the Doctor is the titular character, but the reboot starts with Rose. It shows her day, her job, her family, her life and it’s only at that point that the Doctor is interjected and in some ways he’s just as strange to us as he is to her. When Rose almost doesn’t join the Doctor and he leaves without her, we stay with her until the Doctor comes back. We only get to travel with the Doctor because Rose does. She is our link to the Doctor and the Whoniverse and Bad Wolf and literally everything else. 

And then, in case you didn’t quite get it, RTD does it again. He when we get a new Doctor, we learn him through Rose. For almost the whole of the Christmas invasion, the Doctor sleeps while Rose tries to simultaneously revive the Doctor and save the planet. (Yes, The Doctor is magical and fantastic and brilliant, but it isn’t until after Rose steps up to the plate that the Doctor does anything. And the Christmas Invasion clearly shows that Rose is learning, she will be able to talk to aliens about the Shadow Proclamation and all that jazz, you just need to give her time to catch up to the 900 year old Time Lord.)

And then it happens again after Rose leaves. It’s time for a new companion, so we follow Martha Jones walking down the street as she talks to her family and goes about her job and talks with a coworker. This is the same show, but we purposely exit it so that we can reenter with her and see the Doctor through her and connect with him through her. 

The one exception to this is equally brilliant because it is so purposeful and meaningful that it almost hurts. When series 4 starts and Donna Noble is about to become a companion, we don’t follow her to the Doctor, instead we get the Doctor Donna. They parallel each other. We follow them both simultaneously on almost equal footing. This not only sets up their relationship but foreshadows the “Doctor Donna” that is the thread through the entire season. 

Now, contrast this to Moffat era. How does he open version? We follow the Doctor. It is through the Doctor’s eyes that we meet little Amelia Pond. We see very little of her life and even less of her family. When the Doctor skips forward in time, he (and the audience) don’t even recognize her. Throughout the series we are given very small and contradictory pictures of her job (model, kissogram, beauty product line). 

And when Clara comes, this is even more pronounced. She is a puzzle to him. We view her through his eyes - as a puzzle. Something strange and impossible.

The companion used to be someone who was so very real and they got to see amazing places and be brilliant and fantastic. Now the companion feels constructed and fictional, they’re only fantastic as much as they are strange to us.

RTD made me feel brilliant and gave me hope and sympathy and joy. Moffat gives me amusement at watching a madman with a box. It’s not super horrible in and of itself, but this show used to be so so so much more. It used to really touch me and mean something to me. It doesn’t any more. 

I want you to hijack all of my posts if you continue to write fantastically excellent meta on them.

I faded out of watching Doctor Who somewhere between Lake Silencio and Amy and Rory leaving for good, because it just didn’t grab me any more, but I never stopped to put my finger on why.  I think this is probably it.  All of the discussion about Moffat’s companions being good or bad or super-cool or unfeminist, and it’s not necessarily the characters themselves who are a problem at all.  It’s that we’re getting them from the outside instead of from within.

(It’s making me think about other TV shows now, about the problem with River Tam being that she spends the whole series being too “fantastical” to know from the inside, about Glee as an ensemble show where we’re inside so many people’s heads that it’s not always a given which way a scene is ‘supposed’ to read, about Allison Argent and how she’s the only character besides Scott we really get to consistently ride along with for the first two seasons.  There’s so much to analyze, so many different options.)

(This was an excellent one.)

I wish I could hijack more posts with meta but sadly I am not that awesome. 

I have a lot more problems with Moffat but this is the big one. The stuff he writes is fun on the surface, but it feels shallow and a bit gross whenever I take a second look. And you’re definitely right that it’s not just the characters themselves. The whole time I was writing this I was just thinking what a fantastic and puzzling story it would be if River Song was done RTD style where we follow her relationship with the Doctor through her perspective. I would want to play with some additional things, but that story could be so cool. 

(Yes, River Tam is so fantastically strange that the rest of the crew and the audience literally need pictures of her brain and then shit’s still too complicated for us to understand. Glee is definitely messy, but the clue that it’s Rachel’s show from the beginning is that she gets the first voice-over. And the perspective thin is part of the reason it takes people (or at least me) so long to figure out what a horrible teacher Will is. His lessons and lesson planning and motivations are always framed from his perspective and he always thinks that he’s doing a good job! He thinks he’s a nice guy! So we believe him because we’re seeing what he thinks of himself more often than not.)

c-is-for-circinate:

I think I finally put my finger on what bothers me about all the tons of meta discussing how Mako Mori is really the main character of Pacific Rim.

It’s the same reason I like but am sort of uncomfortable at the idea that Pepper is the hero in IM3, and Natasha in Cap2.  And I do like it, don’t get me wrong—or at least, I sort of like it.  And I’m sort of made really sad.

I am sick of stealth heroines.  I’m sick of the idea that yes, this girl is the center of this movie, but you need an essay to figure that out.  And I’m kind of sick of pretending like we’ve discovered some secret feminist truth in these movies, that of course the main arcs belong to Mako, and Pepper, and Natasha, that this is the way the movie is framed and that’s all there is to it.  Because it’s not.  That’s not all there is to it at all.

Here’s the thing: there are many ways to make a character the hero of the story.  One of these ways is via plot arc.  These ladies get heroic plot arcs, yes, but if you ask the average moviegoing audience member who the main character, the hero of any of those movies is, that’s not what they’re going to say.  And no, we can’t just wave off the average moviegoing audience because they’re blinded by what they expect to see, because they’re not aware enough to have read the same meta essays as us.  There are reasons.

There are reasons it reads like Raleigh is the main character of Pacific Rim, and it’s because that’s how the movie is presented to us.  We get huge swathes of the movie from his POV.  We get the beginning of the movie from his POV.

We get Raleigh’s tragic backstory right there with him, as it happens, we’re with him in that.  We get Mako’s in flashback.  We find it out, we discover it, as Raleigh does.  We come to her from the outside and learn our way in, whereas we start on the inside with Raleigh and stay there the whole time.  That’s the difference between the framing of a main character and a second lead.

I think I’m just tired, you know?  Of seeing analyses that put female characters’ arcs front and center that ignore the fact that the movie itself didn’t.  Did Natasha make the big heroic sacrifice here, did she change the most, did she have the really important arc in this movie?  Yeah, she did.  But she had it all in the background, in passing dialogue and in action scenes, with none of the quiet moments that Steve got to help build his story along.

It’s continually fascinating to me how stories show focus, what they do, how they center one character and not another.  I don’t think we meta about it enough.  I don’t think we talk enough about how shows and movies distinguish which characters we’re with, on the inside, and which we’re watching from across the room.  What are the subtle hints used to say ‘this character is a factor in how events progress’ vs ‘this character is a person’?  And these hints are every bit as important as isolating plot arcs, in determining who’s central to a story and who’s not.

Mako’s a person, but one we’re trying to figure out, not one we start with, not one we’re inside of.  Pepper’s a person, but we get her victory through Tony’s eyes, not her own.  Natasha’s a person, but we only get hints and the brief moment of fingers stilling on a keyboard to tell us how much this means to her.

And I want to talk about what that means more.

Hijacking your post because you managed to articulated the thoughts I have on Moffat vs. RTD Doctor Who.

RTD framed the show to align the companion and the audience. Yes, the Doctor is the titular character, but the reboot starts with Rose. It shows her day, her job, her family, her life and it’s only at that point that the Doctor is interjected and in some ways he’s just as strange to us as he is to her. When Rose almost doesn’t join the Doctor and he leaves without her, we stay with her until the Doctor comes back. We only get to travel with the Doctor because Rose does. She is our link to the Doctor and the Whoniverse and Bad Wolf and literally everything else. 

And then, in case you didn’t quite get it, RTD does it again. He when we get a new Doctor, we learn him through Rose. For almost the whole of the Christmas invasion, the Doctor sleeps while Rose tries to simultaneously revive the Doctor and save the planet. (Yes, The Doctor is magical and fantastic and brilliant, but it isn’t until after Rose steps up to the plate that the Doctor does anything. And the Christmas Invasion clearly shows that Rose is learning, she will be able to talk to aliens about the Shadow Proclamation and all that jazz, you just need to give her time to catch up to the 900 year old Time Lord.)

And then it happens again after Rose leaves. It’s time for a new companion, so we follow Martha Jones walking down the street as she talks to her family and goes about her job and talks with a coworker. This is the same show, but we purposely exit it so that we can reenter with her and see the Doctor through her and connect with him through her. 

The one exception to this is equally brilliant because it is so purposeful and meaningful that it almost hurts. When series 4 starts and Donna Noble is about to become a companion, we don’t follow her to the Doctor, instead we get the Doctor Donna. They parallel each other. We follow them both simultaneously on almost equal footing. This not only sets up their relationship but foreshadows the “Doctor Donna” that is the thread through the entire season. 

Now, contrast this to Moffat era. How does he open version? We follow the Doctor. It is through the Doctor’s eyes that we meet little Amelia Pond. We see very little of her life and even less of her family. When the Doctor skips forward in time, he (and the audience) don’t even recognize her. Throughout the series we are given very small and contradictory pictures of her job (model, kissogram, beauty product line). 

And when Clara comes, this is even more pronounced. She is a puzzle to him. We view her through his eyes - as a puzzle. Something strange and impossible.

The companion used to be someone who was so very real and they got to see amazing places and be brilliant and fantastic. Now the companion feels constructed and fictional, they’re only fantastic as much as they are strange to us.

RTD made me feel brilliant and gave me hope and sympathy and joy. Moffat gives me amusement at watching a madman with a box. It’s not super horrible in and of itself, but this show used to be so so so much more. It used to really touch me and mean something to me. It doesn’t any more. 

spacefeels:

I believe I can soar
you see me runnin’ through that open do-o-ooor

taking a break from sad Stuckys to celebrate Sam Wilson \o/

sconee:

Bucky that isn’t how u play D:«